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Leonardo da Vinci at the Louvre — a startling blockbuster show

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cæsar fredericke, marchant of venice, into the east india, and beyond the indies. wherein are conteined the customes and rites of those countries, the merchandises and commodities, as well of golde and siluer, as spices, drugges, pearles, and other iewels: translated out of italian by m. thomas hickocke. cæsare fredericke to the reader. [sidenote: cæsare fredericke trauelled eighteene yeeres in the east indies.] i hauing (gentle reader) for the space of eighteene yeeres continually coasted and trauelled, as it were, all the east indies, and many other countreys beyond the indies, wherein i haue had both good and ill successe in my trauels: and hauing seene and vnderstood many things woorthy the noting, and to be knowen to all the world, the which were neuer as yet written of any: i thought it good (seeing the almighty had giuen me grace, after so long perils in passing such a long voyage to returne into mine owne countrey, the noble city of venice) i say, i thought it good, as briefly as i could, to write and set forth this voyage made by me, with the maruellous things i haue seene in my trauels in the indies: the mighty princes that gouerne those countreys, their religion and faith that they haue, the rites and customes which they vse, and liue by, of the diuers successe that happened vnto me, and how many of these countreys are abounding with spices, drugs, and iewels, giuing also profitable aduertisement to all those that haue a desire to make such a voyage. and because that the whole world may more commodiously reioyce at this my trauell, i haue caused it to be printed in this order: and now i present it vnto you (gentle and louing readers) to whom for the varieties of things heerein contented, i hope that it shall be with great delight receiued. and thus god of his goodnesse keepe you. a voyage to the east indies, and beyond the indies, &c. [sidenote: the authours going from venice to cyprus and tripoly.] in the yere of our lord god 1653, i cæsar fredericke being in venice, and very desirous to see the east parts of the world, shipped my selfe in a shippe called the gradaige of venice, with certaine marchandise, gouerned by m. iacomo vatica, which was bound to cyprus with his ship, with whom i went: and when we were arriued in cyprus, i left that ship, and went in a lesser to tripoly in soria, where i stayed a while. afterward, i tooke my iourney to alepo, and there i acquainted my selfe with marchants of armenia, and moores, that were marchants, and consorted to go with them to ormus, and wee departed from alepo, and in two dayes iourney and a halfe, we came to a city called bir. of the city called bir. bir is a small city very scarse of all maner of victuals, and nere vnto the walles of the city runneth the riuer of euphrates. [sidenote: the river euphrates.] in this city the marchants diuide themselues into companies, according to their merchandise that they haue, and there either they buy or make a boat to carry them and their goods to babylon downe the riuer euphrates, with charge of a master and mariners to conduct the boat in the voyage: these boats are in a maner flat bottomed, yet they be very strong: and for all that they are so strong, they will serue but for one voyage. they are made according to the sholdnesse of the riuer, because that the riuer is in many places full of great stones, which greatly hinder and trouble those that goe downe the riuer. these boats serue but for one voyage downe the riuer vnto a village called feluchia, because it is impossible to bring them vp the riuer backe againe. [sidenote: feluchia a small city on euphrates.] at feluchia the marchants plucke their boats in pieces, or else sell them for a small price, for that at bir they cost the marchants forty or fifty chickens a piece, and they sell them at feluchia for seuen or eight chickens a piece, because that when the marchants returne from babylon backe againe, if they haue marchandise or goods that oweth custome, then they make their returne in forty dayes thorow the wildernesse, passing that way with a great deale lesser charges then the other way. [sidenote: mosul.] and if they haue not marchandise that oweth custome, then they goe by the way of mosul, where it costeth them great charges both the carouan and company. from bir where the marchants imbarke themselues to feluchia ouer agains babylon, if the riuer haue good store of water, they shall make their voyage in fifteene or eighteene dayes downe the riuer, and if the water be lowe, and it hath not rained, then it is much trouble, and it will be forty or fifty dayes journey downe, because that when the barks strike on the stones that be in the riuer, then they must vnlade them, which is great trouble, and then lade them againe when they haue mended them: therefore it is not necessary, neither doe the marchants go with one boat alone, but with two or three, that if one boat split and be lost with striking on the sholdes, they may haue another ready to take in their goods, vntil such time as they haue mended the broken boat, and if they draw the broken boat on land to mend her, it is hard to defend her in the night from the great multitude of arabians that will come downe there to robbe you: [sidenote: the arabian theeues are in number like to ants.] and in the riuers euery night, when you make fast your boat to the banckeside, you must keepe good watch against the arabians which are theeues in number like to ants, yet when they come to robbe, they will not kill, but steale and run away. harquebuzes are very good weapons against them, for that they stand greatly in feare of the shot. and as you passe the riuer euphrates from bir to feluchia, there are certein places which you must passe by, where you pay custome certaine medines vpon a bale, which custome is belonging to the sonne of aborise king of the arabians and of the desert, who hath certaine cities and villages on the riuer euphrates. feluchia and babylon. [sidenote: the olde babylon hath great trade with marchants still.] feluchia is a village where they that come from bir doe vnbarke themselues and vnlade their goods, and it is distant from babylon a dayes iourney and an halfe by land: babylon is no great city but it is very populous, and of great trade of strangers because it is a great thorowfare for persia, turkia, and arabia: and very often times there goe out from thence carouans into diuers countreys: and the city is very copious of victuals, which comme out of armenia downe the riuer of tygris, on certaine zattares or raffes made of blowen hides or skinnes called vtrij. this riuer tygris doeth wash the walles of the city. these raffes are bound fast together, and then they lay boards on the aforesayd blowen skinnes, and on the boards they lade the commodities, and so come they to babylon, where they vnlade them, and being vnladen, they let out the winde out of the skinnes, and lade them on cammels to make another voyage. this city of babylon is situate in the kingdome of persia, but now gouerned by the turks. on the other side of the riuer towards arabia, ouer against the city, there is a faire place or towne, and in it a faire bazarro for marchants, with very many lodgings, where the greatest part of the marchants strangers which come to babylon do lie with their marchandize. [sidenote: a bridge made of boats.] the passing ouer tygris from babylon to this borough is by a long bridge made of boates chained together with great chaines: prouided, that when the riuer waxeth great with the abundance of raine that falleth, then they open the bridge in the middle, where the one halfe of the bridge falleth to the walles of babylon, and the other to the brinks of this borough, on the other side of the riuer: and as long as the bridge is open, they passe the riuer in small boats with great danger, because of the smalnesse of the boats, and the ouerlading of them, that with the fiercenesse of the streame they be ouerthrowen, or els the streame doth cary them away, so that by this meanes, many people are lost and drowned: this thing by proofe i haue many times seene. of the tower of babylon. the tower of nimrod or babel is situate on that side of tygris that arabia is, and in a very great plaine distant from babylon seuen or eight miles: which tower is ruinated on euery side, and with the falling of it there is made a great mountaine, so that it hath no forme at all, yet there is a great part of it standing which is compassed and almost couered with the aforesayd fallings: this tower was builded and made of foure square brickes, which brickes were made of earth, and dried in the sunne in maner and forme following: first they layed a lay of brickes, [footnote: these bricks be in thicknes six or seuen inches, and a foot and a halfe square.] then a mat made of canes, square as the brickes, and in stead of lime, they daubed it with earth: these mats of canes are at this time so strong, that it is a thing woonderfull to beholde, being of such great antiquity: i haue gone round about it, and haue not found any place where there hath bene any doore or entrance: it may be in my iudgement in circuit about a mile, and rather lesse then more. this tower in effect is contrary to all other things which are seene afar off, for they seeme small, and the more nere a man commeth to them the bigger they be: but this tower afar off seemeth a very great thing, and the nerer you come to it the lesser. my iudgment and reason of this is, that because the tower is set in a very great plaine, and hath nothing more about to make any shew sauing the ruines of it which it hath made round about, and for this respect descrying it a farre off, that piece of the tower which yet standeth with the mountaine that is made of the substance that hath fallen from it, maketh a greater shew then you shall finde comming neere to it. babylon and basora. from babylon i departed for basora, shipping my selfe in one of the barks that vse to go in the riuer tigris from babylon to basora, and from basora to babylon: which barks are made after the maner of fusts or galliots with a speron and a couered poope: they haue no pumpe in them because of the great abundance of pitch which they haue to pitch them with all: which pitch they haue in abundance two dayes iourney from babylon. nere vnto the riuer euphrates, there is a city called heit, nere vnto which city there is a great plaine full of pitch, very maruellous to beholde, a thing almost incredible, that out of a hole [footnote: this hole where out commeth this pitch is most true, and the water and pitch runneth into the valley or iland where the pitch resteth, and the water runneth into the riuer euphrates, and it maketh all the riuer to be as it were brackish with the smell of pitch and brimstone.] in the earth, which continually throweth out pitch into the aire with continuall smoake, this pitch is throwen with such force, that being hot it falleth like as it were sprinckled ouer all the plaine, in such abundance that the plaine is alwayes full of pitch: the mores and arabians of that place say, that that hole is the mouth of hell: and in trueth, it is a thing very notable to be marked: and by this pitch the whole people haue great benefit to pitch their barks, which barks they call daneck and saffin. when the riuer of tygris is well replenished with water, you may passe from babylon to basora in eight or nine dayes, and sometimes more and sometimes lesse: we were halfe so much more which is 14 or 15 daies, because the waters were low: they may saile day and night, and there are some places in this way where you pay so many medins on a baile: if the waters be lowe, it is 18 dayes iourney. basora. [sidenote: zizarij an ancient people.] basora is a city of the arabians, which of olde time was gouerned by those arabians called zizarij, but now it is gouerned by the great turke where he keepeth an army to his great charges. the arabians called zizarij haue the possession of a great countrey, and cannot be ouercome by the turke, because that the sea hath deuided their countrey into an iland by channels with the ebbing and flowing of the sea, and for that cause the turke cannot bring an army against them, neither by sea nor by land, and another reason is, the inhabitants of that iland are very strong and warlike men

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